Border Democrats to illegal aliens: Thanks to BBB, help is on the way, be patient

AP Photo/Gregory Bull

The Build Back Better bill passed this morning in the House but has no chance, as of today, of passing in the Senate. Tucked away inside the bill, there are lots of goodies for illegal aliens, including amnesty, green cards, and increased opportunities for chain migration.

CBO’s analysis confirmed that the bill will increase the U.S. population by millions in the first ten years, thanks to provisions for a huge migration expansion. This is in addition to 6.5 million illegal aliens who will receive parole, a form of amnesty that guarantees protection from deportation. That provision alone is estimated to cost $121.7B by the CBO. Millions of others who are already in the U.S. will gain legal permanent residence status – green cards. Some will gain legal status through relatives who are legal residents.

A Breitbart post today highlights that jobs are taken by the legal status through green cards for contract workers and their families. CBO suggests that at least one million waiting to receive green cards through chain migration during the next ten years.

The beneficiaries include at least one million chain migrants — plus most of the one million foreign contract workers who are now using real or faked H-1B visas and other work permits to take jobs in the United States.

The bill provides the contract workers and their families the hugely valuable prize of U.S green cards. The cards can be converted into citizenship, voting rights, and the ability to bring in chain migrants, after just five years.

Roughly one million contract workers are now working to get the green cards — and roughly 400,000 more are imported each year to take more of the jobs sought by each year’s cohort of 800,000 new U.S. skilled graduates.

BBB sets up a six-year cycle for the millions of migrants waiting for green cards through chain migration. CBO says this will incentivize chain migration.

The BBB bill says the current waiting list of 4 million chain migrants would be allowed to pick up green cards if they can fly into the United States as tourists. For example, a family of four could fly into Newark, New Jersey, and then buy the right to live and work in the United States for the price of just $2,400.

Currently, about 230,000 chain migrants get green cards each year, so the BBB legislation likely would double the chain migration inflow.

But the rapid inflow will also create a huge incentive for many more immigrants to sponsor their foreign relatives for chain-migration status. That incentive could rapidly accelerate the inflow because each new migrant could bring in their extended family about six years after getting a green card — and those migrants could try to bring in their relatives six years later.

Two Texas Democrats delivered a little pep talk to illegal aliens waiting on legal status. Be patient, they said. Accept what is in the BBB now, which is mostly work permits and protection from deportation, and be patient as Democrats continue to work for pathways to citizenship and blanket amnesty.

“Immigrants are essential, and America is their home. They deserve to be here. Congress must deliver this much-needed relief in the form of work permits and deportation protection,” U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, said on the steps of the Capitol.

He was joined by advocates and some of the immigrants who stand to benefit from the bill.

U.S. Rep. Veronica Escobar, D-Texas, said securing the current benefits in the act is a start.

“What we are left with very likely is work permits and protections. While that is absolutely inadequate, we have to get that across the finish line,” she said. “It buys Congress more time so we can fulfill our obligation and ensure we give them the path to citizenship they deserve.”

Both Democrats praise illegal aliens, especially those employed as essential workers.

Both Castro and Escobar showered praise on undocumented immigrants in the food, hospitality and health industries who reported to their jobs during the COVID-19 pandemic while most American professionals got to work from home.

“In San Antonio, immigrant essential workers have continued to keep our city safe, healthy and moving forward during this pandemic,” Castro said. “Immigrants are entrepreneurs, job creators, innovators, consumers and essential workers that power our country’s economy and create employment opportunities for all Americans. Some industries wouldn’t exist or prosper without them.”

Yes, many American professionals worked from home during the pandemic, but essential workers did not. Legal American citizens working in essential services continued to work throughout the pandemic from the beginning of it when offices were shutting down, sending home those with jobs that could be done from home. Clerks and stockers continued to work in retail stores, for example. There was a huge boom in delivery services, too. To imply that it has been only illegal aliens bravely working at the forefront of the pandemic is absurd.

Most Americans are ok with legal immigration, especially with limits in place as to how many can be accepted each year. The open borders faction of the Democrat Party conflate legal and illegal immigration. It’s a dishonest way to debate immigration reform measures. Illegal aliens feel emboldened and entitled to be allowed to remain in the U.S., especially those who have avoided deportation for many years. One such person told his story at the invitation of Castro and Escobar.

“Last year I found myself with depression and anxiety due to the fear of deportation,” said Julio Calderon, a native of Honduras with a pending removal order dating back to 2006. “I’ve never had access to a driver’s license, never had access to an ID. I know that any interaction with (law enforcement) could put me back in Honduras, a country I have not even been to in the last 16 years.”

Calderon said he and his family now have deep ties in the United States and have made something of themselves.

“I now have an economics degree from Florida International University,” he said. “My parents have (Temporary Protected Status), my sister is a U.S. citizens and my brother is on (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). That’s four different status in a family of six. That’s why we say the immigration system is broken.”

Calderon was ordered to be deported in 2006. He’s still here, living his life. He received a college education and brought other family members here. This is no way to persuade skeptics for increases in blanket amnesty. Yet, Democrats like Castro and Escobar continue to encourage illegal aliens to just be patient, help is on the way. We are either a nation of laws or we are not. Borders have to be secured and the legal process of immigration has to be restored. We are a sovereign nation and it’s past time to act like that.