Get ready for a "carbon monitoring credit card"

(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

If you’re one of those people who enjoys scolding others over their “carbon footprint” all the time, it’s easy enough to monitor the news and call out people who are acting in an insufficiently woke fashion. But what about yourself? Do you ever sit and wonder if perhaps you’re causing part of the problem, perhaps without even realizing it? According to our liberal friends, every action you take on this planet, right down to each breath you draw (because you’re exhaling carbon dioxide all day, you monster), contributes to the total carbon load. That also applies to all of the purchases you make. Are you buying from the most climate-friendly sources? Are you buying too much gasoline or taking too many plane trips?

Fear not! The solution is here. As is being reported this week at Climate Depot, there is a new credit card being made available that will put your mind at ease. Every transaction you engage in will be rated and scored in terms of how much it expands your carbon footprint. And once you reach your “carbon limit” for the month, it will shut off and not allow you to make any more purchases. Isn’t this just the coolest idea ever for all of your global warming-conscious friends?

Get ready for a Chinese-style social credit system scoring when it comes to your personal spending habits and how they impact “climate change.” A new credit card called Doconomy, has launched that is “working in tight collaboration with Mastercard” and an alliance with the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) is now available so you can monitor your personal CO2 budget on every purchase you make.

The new CO2 monitoring Mastercard called Doconomy debuted in order to enable “all users to track, measure and understand their impact by presenting their carbon footprint on every purchase.” The credit cards feature the slogan on them reading “DO. Everyday Climate Action” and have a personal pledge on the rear of the card boasting: “I am taking responsibility for every transaction I make to help protect the planet.” The Mastercards feature the UN “Global Climate Action” logo on them as well.

Putting the UN Global Climate Action logo on the card is just the icing on the cake. Now you can virtue signal to everyone standing in line at the register every time you make a purchase.

The Doconomy website asks the question, “With fat, sugar and salt levels labeled on food we buy, why shouldn’t our CO2 emissions be just as visible?” Well, I suppose if that’s your priority in life, why not? As long as it only monitoring your purchases and not the rest of us, have a blast, pal. Oh, we should also note that they are partnering with Mastercard in this effort if that has any impact on your future purchasing decisions.

This scheme should raise a couple of immediate questions for anyone considering it, however. Exactly how “hard” of a limit is your hard carbon limit? Unexpected things happen in all of our lives from time to time. What if you know you’re getting close to your monthly limit but you receive a call telling you that a sibling was just rushed to the hospital and you need to drive to a different city to be with them? Let’s say you pull into the gas station to fill up your tank and find out that you can only purchase two dollars worth of gas before your card shuts down?

Are there any emergency provisions in this plan? Would you be able to pinky swear that you’ll take the bus all of next month if your credit card will just allow you to make this one important trip?

This is simply more madness from the extremist left. But they apparently are ready to buy into it. Doconomy is claiming that they are already providing 90 million customers with “carbon footprint insights.” Of course, that doesn’t mean that 90 million people have signed up for a card that will automatically shut down, right? They’re just providing “insights” to everyone else. Personally, I can assure you that the first time my credit card starts sending me nagging notes about my carbon footprint, I’ll be signing up for a new card elsewhere. And since we never really carry over a balance from month to month, we could do it pretty quickly.