The process itself was straightforward. Madeline’s newly extracted wisdom teeth–baby teeth can be saved, too—were bathed in a special solution, loaded into a Styrofoam container lined with cold packs and sent to the stem cell company. There, a team harvested the dental stem cells from the pulp, then grew them in culture and cryogenically preserved them. Store-A-Tooth charges $1500-1749 for tooth collection and $120 per year for storage, while other dental pulp stem cell tissue banks cost $500-$600 upfront and in the $120 range annually for storage.

The rationale here is that if you missed out on banking your baby’s umbilical cord blood, this gives you another chance to harvest their stem cells. “If their child later develops an illness that could be managed or even cured with stem cell therapy, this is an insurance policy,” says Amr Moursi, DDS, PhD, chair of the department of pediatric dentistry at New York University College of Dentistry.

But is there a genuine potential here for some effective treatments in the relatively near future—or is this just another trendy fad? Scientific opinion is decidedly mixed.