More and more, it seems like Senate Democrats’ good fortunes are also tied to the GOP presidential front-runner’s fortunes. And it was a really great night for Trump. He decisively won all five states. “I consider myself the presumptive nominee,” he said Tuesday from the gleaming Trump Tower in New York.

Trump had good reason to brag: Politics and math are on his side now as much as ever. He’s making strides toward the delegate total that will allow him to enter the convention in Cleveland and argue the majority of GOP primary voters chose him. (You need 1,237 delegates to become the Republican nominee.) It’s also increasingly difficult for Trump’s rivals, Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, to beat him at contests before then — quixotic truce and all.

Let’s tie this back to Senate Democrats. If Trump is the nominee, he will be the most unpopular presidential candidate since the former head of the Ku Klux Klan, according to Washington Post-ABC News polling. Seven in 10 women view Trump negatively, according to recent NBC News-Wall Street Journal polling. So do 3 in 4 millennials and 4 in 5 Hispanics.