Fired Christie aide hints that immunity would release her emails

The aide to Gov. Chris Christie at the center of a massive scandal now threatening Christie’s political future stepped out of the shadows today as her attorney fought to keep her emails and phone records out of reach of the committee investigating last September’s controversial closures of access lanes to the George Washington Bridge.

Bridget Anne Kelly, who was Christie’s deputy chief of staff, sat quietly in a Trenton courtroom and her attorney, Michael Critchley, seemed to suggest the former aide wanted immunity so she could testify about what happened at the bridge and whether it was a move to punish a local politician who wouldn’t back Christie.

During the lengthy hearing, Superior Court Judge Mary Jacobsen said to Critchley, “You act as if they could very easily afford immunity and that would take care of everything.”

Critchley snapped his fingers and said, “Like that, like that.” He added, “They don’t want to give us immunity, not that they can’t.”