If Hillary Clinton wants to battle Bernie Sanders for the youth vote and “unify the Democratic Party,” what should her strategy be? Address their concerns, or tell them that they’re too caught up in their youth to listen to their elders? On Morning Joe today, Hillary chose … poorly:

“Look, I think it’s exciting to be, in effect, protesting. I remember I did that a long time ago when I was in my 20s, and I totally get the attraction of this.”

Yes, Grandma, please tell us how you protested “a long time ago” as a way to connect to those at the kiddie table. And please explain further how these voters are merely succumbing to an “attraction” to a 74-year-old socialist rather than asking yourself why you have no traction among Democratic voters under the age of 45. As a reminder of the Wisconsin exit polls from my earlier post:

  • 18-24: Sanders 84/16
  • 25-29: Sanders 79/20
  • 30-39: Sanders 69/31
  • 40-49: Sanders 58/44

Gee, I wonder why the young folks aren’t finding connections with the woman reminding them to know their place, and why they might find affinity with a candidate who treats them like they’re grown up. It’s not difficult to figure out; David Axelrod even issued a public ix-nay on the ondescencion-kay alert:

It’s bad enough that Brian Fallon tried damage control — and made it worse, as Kasie Hunt pointedly noted in the interview:

“Some of their parents voted for Hillary Clinton”? Seriously? This is a campaign in serious denial about its candidate’s shortcomings, and seemingly has adopted the worst of them.