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Can you "unvaccinate" yourself? The short answer is no

(AP Photo/Al-hadji Kudra Maliro)

Today’s story comes to us from the category of “I Can’t Believe We Actually Have to Say This, But…”

NBC News has a story out this week that I had first assumed was some sort of parody, but apparently it’s not. The story starts from a totally plausible premise. There are people out there who have made the decision to get vaccinated under threats imposed by government mandates despite not wishing to do so. Some make the choice to save their jobs or to be allowed to travel to visit friends and family. But afterward, they experience regret over the choice. As I said, all of that is totally understandable.

But now, some online “influencers” have been promoting a solution to their quandary. It comes in the form of various “cures” that supposedly allow you to “unvaccinate” yourself through a variety of home remedies. They all sound fairly silly, but some appear to be downright dangerous.

In a TikTok video that has garnered hundreds of thousands of views, Dr. Carrie Madej outlined the ingredients for a bath she said will “detox the vaxx” for people who have given into Covid-19 vaccine mandates…

The video is one of several methods anti-vaccine influencers and communities on social media have in recent weeks suggested to their many followers who have capitulated and received the Covid shot. Anti-vaccine message boards are now littered with users caving to societal pressure or work mandates and receiving a coronavirus vaccination.

“Once you’re injected, the lifesaving vaccination process has already begun. You can’t unring a bell. It’s just not physically possible,” said Angela Rasmussen, a virologist and adjunct professor at the University of Saskatchewan in Canada.

The video from Carrie Madej is simply alarming. The bath she proposes to “detox the vaxx” includes some relatively benign ingredients such as baking soda and Epsom salts, along with Bentonite clay. Those don’t sound like they will mess you up too much if not done to excess, but they also won’t remove any “radiation” or poison from your system supposedly created by the vaccine. It’s when she goes on to suggest adding a powerful dose of borax to the mix that things really go off the rails. Borax is a skin and eye irritant and the FDA has banned it as a food additive. It may not be immediately and directly lethal, but it’s certainly not good for you. And even if you believe there are nanobots of some sort in the vaccine (I don’t personally believe our tech has reached that stage yet), this “bath” isn’t going to draw them out.

I’m no doctor, but I follow more than a few of them and try to research any medical treatments I undergo as much as possible. When you get injected with a vaccine, it’s spreading in your system in a matter of minutes and it’s self-replicating as it goes. One doctor who has commented on the subject described how any and all changes to your blood supply rather quickly make their way all the way down to your bone marrow. Even if you went in for a complete blood transfusion you would never get rid of it entirely.

Look, I have my own reservations about the mRNA technology that’s now sweeping through the pharmaceutical industry. And I thought about it long and hard before getting vaccinated after consulting with my doctor. And even then I only did it because I am in one of the higher-risk groups for a very bad or lethal outcome if I contract the disease. While I hope that it won’t happen, I still won’t be totally shocked if further, extensive testing reveals significant issues with these vaccines after years of prolonged, repeated vaccinations. It just doesn’t feel like we have enough data yet.

Also, I can understand some of the mistrust in the messaging on this subject. The media has jumped on the bandwagon with Faucci and his friends many times and they’ve frequently gotten things wrong. I’m sure you all recall how we were lectured about not taking hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID, mostly just because Trump endorsed it. But then it turned out to be quite effective in treating at least some patients. So any mistrust you may feel toward the establishment in this matter is understandable.

But with all of that said, the idea that you can reverse a vaccine once it’s in your body is simply silly. I don’t believe the best medical facilities in the world could do that for you even if they were willing to try. I’m not here suggesting that anyone else should or shouldn’t get vaccinated. That’s a decision only you should make in consultation with healthcare providers you trust. But if could ask anything of you, it would be that you not take all of your advice from somebody on TikTok.