So... how's that flood of migrants working out for Germany?

Angela Merkel’s big heart and generous nature have earned her high praise in some circles for her handling of the initial phases of the European migrant crisis. Unfortunately this has resulted in a flood of new guests in her country, filling up not only refugee camps, but invading nearby towns and raising all manner of concerns among the locals. And while the initial offer of relief was geared toward providing relief for those fleeing the violence in Syria, the majority of the newcomers turned out to not be from that region at all. Reporters caught up with one pair of brothers and their families who came from Karachi, Pakistan and are now living in very nice homes in Germany. (Daily Mail)

‘We paid a trafficking agent for false visas to fly here to Germany,’ says 34-year-old Atif. ‘We claimed asylum and came to Giessen camp with other migrants. Three weeks ago, because we had families, they gave us a proper home.’

Atif is well-dressed and speaks perfect English. He used to be a transport manager at Karachi airport and is from a well-to-do family. Between mouthfuls of curry, he adds: ‘But there is violence between political gangs in Karachi. Lots of people are leaving for Europe. The trafficker decided that Germany was the place for us because it is welcoming refugees.’

Most are not living in houses yet, however, and the refugee camps are overflowing into the nearby towns. The newcomers are bringing a very different culture with them and the Germans are just starting to wake up to precisely how much life has changed.

Yesterday, the Mail reported how social workers and women’s groups in Giessen wrote a letter to the local state parliament claiming that rape and child abuse were rife in the refugee camp. The allegations were corroborated by Atif over his curry. ‘The camp is dangerous,’ he agreed. ‘Men of different nationalities fight and women are attacked.’

Many women have felt the need to sleep in their clothes… they won’t go to the toilet at night because rapes and assaults have taken place on their way to, or from, there.

The letter says the camp, far from being a peaceful haven for those fleeing war, is a dangerous melting-pot, where there have been ‘numerous rapes and sexual assaults, and forced prostitution’.

There are even reports of children being raped and subjected to sexual assault, it adds.

Officials in Giessen have taken to warning their own citizens not to go out alone at night. Near the local school they have suggested that women and children not leave their homes dressed in a “provocative” style that exposes too much skin because of the assaults taking place. The generous nature of the residents is clearly being put to the test.

These are only the earliest reports coming out of Germany since the initial flood of “refugees” began to arrive and they are expecting up to a million more in the months to come. As noted above, barely a third of them are actually fleeing Syria, with the rest coming from other places like Pakistan as “economic migrants” who are looking forward to enjoying Germany’s generous welfare state. By this point it’s not too difficult to imagine that the Germans are beginning to wonder how much more they can absorb. Their largely Christian nation is being overrun by a different culture, and while Germany has been one of the most prosperous members of the EU, just how many “guests” can they afford to feed and house? How many new police units will they have to fund to keep track of the spiraling crime? And when it comes to people like the brothers from Pakistan interviewed for the article, how will they manage vetting all of these people and trying to evict those who are not victims of ISIS, but simply interlopers looking to cash in on Germany’s generosity?

Who could have predicted all of this? Pretty much anyone who wasn’t caught up in the fairy tale. But we’re still on track to take in tens of thousands ourselves here in the United States of Barack Obama and John Kerry get their way. Keep an eye on Germany in the weeks and months to come. That’s going to be happening over here, and probably sooner rather than later.