Men and women who endorse “hegemonic masculinity” — an idealized form of manhood where White, heterosexual men have power, status and dominance over women, gay men, men with disabilities, racial or religious minorities and other groups — are more likely to be supporters for US President Donald Trump than those who don’t embrace dominant masculinity, according to new research.

“What this work shows is that masculinity is not just an ideology that men strive to achieve. It’s something we value as a culture,” said lead author Theresa Vescio, a professor of psychology and women’s, gender and sexuality studies at Pennsylvania State University.

“The beauty of masculinity as cultural ideology is we can get women to participate in it and endorse it, even though it’s subordinating them. We can get men of color, low socioeconomic status men, gay men to endorse it even though it’s implicitly subordinating,” Vescio said.