The committee says nothing about its business until actions are taken. And it has a lot of business before it: Seven Democratic senators filed a complaint against the two GOP senators who led the effort to object to the election results, arguing that they ‘lent legitimacy” to the cause of those who invaded the Capitol. Hawley fired back with a counter complaint alleging “improper conduct” for partisan gain.

The panel is led by Chair Chris Coons (D-Del.), who called for Cruz (R-Texas) and Hawley (R-Mo.) to resign, and Vice Chair James Lankford (R-Okla.), who planned to challenge the election results himself before backing away after the invasion of the Capitol. Coons and Lankford speak frequently to each other and have a warm relationship, just as Coons did with former Chairman Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.)…

Republicans outside the committee say that even though they disagree with Hawley and Cruz’s conduct, they oppose using the committee to probe electoral objections, which they see as a break from investigations that often center around issues like improper gifts. Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) said she doesn’t agree with anyone seeking to punish senators despite her opposite view of the matter.

“It’s a very slippery slope if you start punishing senators for holding unpopular views and exercising their rights on the Senate floor,” she said. “That’s not what I think of the Ethics Committee as being for. I don’t see how this is an ethics complaint.”