As president, it seems Trump has found another reason to like court fights: If he wins, fantastic — he gets to do the policy he wanted. And if he loses, well, that’s really not so bad — he gets to tell his supporters how the deep state is biased against him, how these swamp creatures are dragging down his heroic efforts to Make America Great Again…

This approach to lawsuits is undoubtedly informed by Trump’s attitude toward media coverage, which is grounded in a firm belief that all publicity is advantageous. When his wife plagiarized Michelle Obama at the Republican National Convention in 2016, Trump was unflustered because the plagiarism made headlines. “Good news is Melania’s speech got more publicity than any in the history of politics,” he tweeted, “especially if you believe that all press is good press!” Favorable coverage is preferable to negative coverage, he acknowledged in The Art of the Deal, but “from a bottom-line perspective, bad publicity is sometimes better than no publicity at all.” (This “probably says something perverse about the culture we live in,” the same paragraph mused in a line that must have originated with the book’s ghostwriter.)

Likewise, for Trump, losing in court can be better than not going to court at all. A win is ideal, but a loss still furthers the narrative of Trump, champion of the people, fiercely fighting the Washington establishment. A few lost battles don’t mean he’s losing the war. In fact, they can help remind the base — er, the home front — to do their part for the war effort.