In one January interview, at the Davos economic forum, Trump floated a “very big” middle- class tax cut for 2021 if “we win the House back,” suggesting the details could come in 90 days; in another interview there, he told CNBC he would “take a look” at changing Social Security. Ninety days came and went without a tax plan, and the Social Security line, which clashed with the campaign’s position, has not reappeared since. “We’ve done really well with health care, but we’re coming up with a plan that’s going to be fantastic,” Trump added, though no plan has emerged.

While the president has repeatedly floated an idea, then abandoned it — a plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, a post-midterm tax cut — the pandemic threw any firmer plans into disarray. “New Heights,” one of the last Trump TV spots to run before the pandemic, recapped the job growth and defense investments of the first three years and promised that “the best is yet to come,” the slogan that Trump would repeat at the end of his winter rallies.

But before that, the pitch for a second term was to keep up every project from the first term. Previous presidents have gotten more specific.