Almost daily, Pelosi pops up on one network or another — even cycling through the late-night talk show junket — dropping in for interviews from a computer propped up on a dining room table that sits just off her West Coast kitchen.

“He has the bully pulpit and that’s a good thing for a president to have. It’s a bad thing for the health of the country if the president is not speaking truth,” Pelosi said in an interview. “Our purpose is really to say how do we follow the science, the evidence, the data … that will take us down from this.”

For Pelosi, leading the counterprogramming is the most effective antidote to Trump’s nearly daily briefings. Since first joining the news conferences a month ago, Trump has been repeatedly criticized for peppering his appearances with falsehoods during the briefings, which often stretch beyond two hours.

And even as former Vice President Joe Biden becomes the presumptive Democratic nominee, it’s Pelosi who remains the most prominent face of opposition against Trump.