But that’s just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Harris’s tenure.

There’s the case of Daniel Larsen. After 11 years of incarceration, a federal judge ruled that he was innocent. Harris kept him in prison for two more years while she appealed this decision on a technicality: She argued that Larsen hadn’t provided proof in a timely manner.

This was not her only bad conduct with regard to wrongfully convicted citizens.

My two indirect experiences with Harris’s department during her tenure as attorney general (from January 2011 to January 2017) revealed a similarly callous regard for justice. The first was as a pro bono habeas investigator trying to free an innocent young man named Eric Frimpong from prison. The second was as an author chronicling the wrongful civil prosecution of a California company by both the State of California and the Department of Justice. In both, the deputy attorneys general working for Harris, if not at her behest, seemed less concerned with doing justice than with keeping the conviction count up and scoring a payday for the state.