Without winds, rains, snows, glaciers, rockslides, or any other means of moving and rearranging the particles on the surface of the Moon, any footprints that we left there should remain for an interminable length of time. The only rearrangement of lunar sand and grains that we know of occurs when there are impacts on the Moon which kick up dust, which then can settle across the lunar surface.

Sunlight striking these particles is inefficient; the lunar atmosphere is only approximately one atom thick; launch and lander activity isn’t energetic enough to substantially alter the distribution of material on the Moon. If we ever landed and traveled on the Moon, the evidence should still be there.

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which has orbited and mapped the Moon at the highest resolution ever, returning hundreds of Terabytes of data, has something to say about that.