Their lack of appetite to provoke another showdown represents a shift after two previous fights resulted in brief government shutdowns and risks alienating the party’s liberal base crucial in midterm elections. But several events have sapped the party’s resolve. Moderate Democrats flinched after a three-day January shutdown fought over immigration; court decisions have left Trump’s cancellation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in legal limbo; and many Democrats are quietly eager to pass the next spending bill and lock in more money for key agencies.

“The current predicament illustrates how you really only had one bite at the apple of taking a stand over the funding of the government on this [DACA] issue,” said Brian Fallon, a Democratic consultant who is close to Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) “The previous attempt was either going to be successful, or this gambit was going to fall apart, and what’s happened is it has fallen apart.”