This creates expectations for politics. Millennials are “less likely to be satisfied with two static choices, and more apt to be swayed to change their tune,” says the report. They “are much more likely to switch the party they support from election to election — even amongst those who claim to ‘lean’ towards one party or another.”

Consider this: In a 2013 Harvard survey, 52% of 18- to 24-year-olds said they’d recall and replace President Obama.

But aren’t we always hearing about how liberal Millennials are? Third Way’s Michelle Diggles told me that while it’s true they are more liberal than previous generations, “a plurality of Millennials are moderates.” She added, “They are more pro-gay marriage, but also slightly less likely to support legalized abortion.” This mix-and-match approach on divisive social issues is unique, reflecting Millennials’ non-ideological views.

Diggles pointed out that what drew Millennials to Obama was his post-racial, post-partisan message. They were not checking the Democratic box. The report found that “Millennials are pragmatic — they want to know what works and are willing to take ideas from each side. They eschew ideological purity tests.”