The president could pivot to the center and regain some of the high ground he occupied in his 2008 campaign. He could say that while he disagreed with the court’s decision, the justices had the responsibility under our system to decide whether the law was constitutional. Everyone needs to respect and accept the verdict. …

But Mr. Obama appears unlikely to take this measured approach. He foreshadowed his possible response during a Rose Garden news conference on April 2, as the court prepared for private deliberations on its decision. Mr. Obama said he was “confident” the court would not take the “unprecedented, extraordinary step of overturning a law that was passed by a strong majority of a democratically elected Congress.” If “an unelected group of people . . . overturn a duly constituted and passed law,” it would be evidence of “judicial activism.” …

Fortunately, Mr. Romney is offering an attractive health-care agenda. At an Orlando speech Tuesday, he touted his consumer-centered approach to replacing ObamaCare. Among his proposals are letting families buy health insurance across state lines; increasing how much Americans can save tax-free for medical expenses; making health insurance portable so Americans can take it with them from job to job; and allowing small businesses to pool risk to get discounts like big companies do.