Trump admits the midterms are about him, not the GOP

He is also fond of trashing any election process, not Georgia’s, to feed his Big Lie. Before a recall effort to unseat California’s Democratic governor was defeated in a landslide on Sept. 14, Trump said the balloting would be “totally rigged.” In Georgia last January, his words were harsher — he said the Senate races would be “illegal and invalid” — but the effect is the same.

Republicans can spin this all they want, but they know what Trump is doing is straight-up voter suppression. To stay on his good side, members of the GOP have to back the Big Lie, then accept that, come next November, there is a good likelihood he will be telling his voters the elections are rigged. Should anyone Trump is targeting with a challenger survive their primary, he is likely to tell voters in that district they would be better off with the Democrat instead. And Republicans will do little to stop him.

Georgia GOP officials were so angry at Trump Saturday night that they … sent texts to Greg Bluestein, political reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, stating it was “a new low,” an “s-show,” and another lamented, “I am just so mad — beyond words.” Not one has said anything publicly.

Indeed, publicly Republicans still pretend that Trump — and his efforts to destabilize our elections — is just fine. The chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, Rep. Tom Emmer, told CNN that Trump should, you know, just do his thing. “The former president can do whatever he wants. It’s very personal to him. I get it. We’re focused on winning the majority. And that’s what we’re going to do.”