Procter & Gamble's toxic sanctimony

You may remember that P&G, which I un-fondly refer to Protest & Grumble, has dipped its sanctimonious toe into social justice waters before. In 2017, the company tackled identity politics with a video called “The Talk.” The preachy ad stoked fear and hatred of police and perpetuated racial stereotypes of officers lurking around every corner waiting to pounce on innocent black children and teenagers — alienating law enforcement families across the country and insulting every minority cop to boot.

The backlash against that ad apparently didn’t faze Protest & Grumble’s activist zealots. Once again, industry marketers are proving they’re not satisfied with selling useful products people want and need. No, they’re hell-bent on exploiting successful businesses to cram odious politics down consumers’ throats.

Like many Silicon Valley giants (hello, Facebook and Twitter) and SJW-hijacked sports enterprises (hello, NFL and ESPN), Gillette is now openly discriminating against its consumers-turned-critics to curry political favor with the #MeToo movement. Savvy social media observers caught the company throttling negative comments and dislikes on its YouTube video. They can manipulate likes and de-platform dissenters. But they won’t be able to disguise the bloodletting effect of toxic sanctimony on their bottom line.