Impeaching Trump an option top Democrats don't want to touch

But Nadler and other House Democratic leaders are still stopping short of citing the constitutional power of impeachment that they could wield — and that some party activists are demanding they pursue. It’s a move that could backfire by coming off as partisan overkill and prove futile because impeachment by the House would be unlikely to result in removal of the president by the Senate, where the Republicans increased their majority in Tuesday’s elections.

“Now is not the time to consider impeachment,” Representative Steny Hoyer of Maryland, the No 2 House Democrat, said in a statement. “Special Counsel Mueller must be allowed to complete his investigation. The president’s decision to ask for Attorney General Sessions’s resignation underscores the need for Congress to take action to protect that investigation.”

Instead, the leaders are emphasizing that once they gain control of House committees they’ll use their power to call hearings and issue subpoenas to investigate possible Trump campaign collusion with Russia and whether the president is seeking to obstruct justice. They’re also reviving a push for legislation intended to shield Mueller from interference.