The global network has become dangerously unstable

It all goes to show that networks are transforming not only the economy — through viral advertising, targeted marketing, and “sharing” of cars and apartments — but also the public sphere and democracy itself.

On Thursday, Facebook founder, chairman, and CEO Mark Zuckerberg posted a long defense of his ideal of an interconnected world. “As the largest global community,” Zuckerberg wrote, “Facebook can explore examples of how community governance might work at scale.” The example he cited was last month’s anti-Trump Women’s March.

The reality is that the global network has become a dangerously unstable structure. Far from promoting equality, the network does the opposite, by allowing hyperconnected “superhubs” to emerge. Surprise, surprise, from Donald Trump to PewDiePie, these turn out to be rather the reverse of saintly role models.

Far from spreading truth and love, the network excels at disseminating lies and hate, because those are the things we nasty, fallen human beings like to click on. If Zuckerberg seriously intends to turn Facebook into the vanguard of liberal world government, then he is on a fast track to joining George Soros at the top of Steve Bannon’s Most Hated list.