The case for stickin': Don't leave the GOP just yet

Besides, fleeing the party is a tacit concession that this is now Trump’s party. It isn’t. You don’t abandon your house the first time a houseguest overstays his welcome (unless you’re Dennis Wilson, and that houseguest is Charles Manson — but that’s a different story). Trump’s attempt at a hostile takeover isn’t complete.

Trump could lose in November, and the base could then come to its senses. If that happens, Republican voters might finally have to have a “Come to Jesus” meeting.

If Trumpism turns out to be a bubble, then that means voters might start looking around for Republican leaders who can help lead them out of the wilderness when it finally bursts.

Conservative leader Morton Blackwell says that “in moments of crisis, the initiative passes to those who are best prepared.” Guess who’s not prepared to help rescue a flailing political party? That’s right. The people who didn’t stick it out. If the party wakes up, only the loyal and stalwart will have permission to put it back together.