Tea-party class of 2010 reassesses its record

Some now say the 2010 class’s goals were unrealistic and that they didn’t fully appreciate how hard it would be to repeal ObamaCare and other White House priorities with Senate Democrats repeatedly blocking GOP bills and the president armed with a veto pen.

“It didn’t quite move as fast as we thought it would. People came to do something and, quite frankly, very little has been accomplished,” said Rep. Daniel Webster (R-Fla.), an unsuccessful candidate for Speaker last fall who was drawn out of his congressional district in a redistricting plan that’s being litigated in the courts.

Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-Texas), who joined the Tea Party Caucus after defeating an incumbent Democrat during the 2010 wave, is seeking reelection but conceded that the job has fallen far short of his expectations.

“You come in and you suddenly realize you’re 1/435th of one-third of the government, you’ve got people calling you all sorts of names on Twitter that they wouldn’t say in church, and your kids take it hard,” Farenthold, a former conservative talk radio host, told The Hill.

“The bulk of what we’re doing is playing defense from a Republican standpoint, and that’s tough,” he said. “We tried and tried to change things, and the president won’t sign squat.”