Why does Trump need a ground game, anyway?

At any point, Trump certainly could use a field operation to identify likely voters for him whose support he wanted to shore up through ongoing communication, but the medium in which Trump is most effective is the least targetable. If he wanted to mail those targets, for instance, a copy of either his immigration plan or the disclosure of his personal finances—both apparently sources of equal pride to his candidacy—requires capital but not manpower. (Given that he brags about not using a pollster, Trump would face some methodological hurdles building such statistical models.)

But using volunteers for such persuasion would seem to neutralize Trump’s greatest strength as a communicator. Would there be any better way to gut the “Make America Great Again” message of its appeal than to have it delivered, face to face, by a mere mortal?

If supporters are eager to give their free time to the multibillionaire candidate, he would be wise to keep them away from phone banks or doorstep canvasses where they try to influence other voters on his behalf. Instead, he would probably find their labor most valuable building the crowds at events that sustain Trump’s abnormally intense media coverage. The political world can believe that Trump’s “much more traditional campaign” is just around the corner; he just needs to continue to do exactly what he’s been doing.