Is this the end of Trump? Nope, probably not

The Trump campaign is like nothing else in recent memory. Other than to “make America great again,” he has articulated no vision or policy goals. Other than calling his opponents names – “dummy,” “loser” – he has done little to contrast himself with other Republican candidates. Even the fact that he has chosen the Republican Party to run in, despite his campaign contributions through the years to Democrats, has little in the way of historical precedent.

“I wanted to give the man a lot of latitude because I know he taps into some anger that even I share,” Erickson told the RedState audience Saturday morning before explaining Trump was disinvited.

That anger, and Trump’s ability to write his own campaign checks, means he isn’t going anywhere. He can continue flying on his personal 757 jet to Iowa, New Hampshire and the other early states, can continue paying staff to organize supporters and build a get-out-the-vote operation, can even start buying intensive television ads. And, as long his polling support nationally keeps him in the top 10 of the 17 candidates, he is likely to win a spot at the next televised GOP debate next month in California.

How much is Trump willing to spend of his fortune to keep going? Will he lose interest if he starts falling in the polls? Or will he only start lashing out even more aggressively?