Concern but not fear at RNC over Hillary run in 2016

And then there is the unquestionable appeal of electing a female president. The arrival of another momentous first in American political and social life, Republicans worry, could turn out to be every bit as powerful as it was in the election of the first African-American in 2008.

With no GOP women making any moves thus far toward even exploring a potential bid, the opposition party’s ability to limit this Clinton advantage may be minimal.

Indiana-based Republican strategist Pete Seat noted that even though “Clinton fatigue” figures to be one of the more potent factors Republicans could leverage, the opportunity for voters to once again “create history” figures to be at least as real.

“Is it going to be a ‘who’ election or a ‘what’ election? Are we going to care about personalities, or are we going to care about issues?” Seat asked aloud. “Because the last several cycles, it’s been the ‘who.’ Just look at [Mitt] Romney. Most people, when it came to jobs and the economy, were with him. But what ended up happening?”