These Republicans aren't very specific about their economic solutions

Part of the reason for the turbulence could be that many voters have yet to hear specific solutions to the specific economic problems their regions face. The difficulty confronting the GOP candidates, not to mention Obama, is that the economic problems — and possible solutions — vary widely across the country.

Factory workers in critical swing states such as Michigan and Ohio have been buoyed by the Obama administration’s auto bailout, which helped reverse the car industry’s long slide. For many of them, the idea of government intervention is a good thing.

But many workers in South Carolina think the opposite is true, partly because a government agency, the National Labor Relations Board, through a charge of unfair labor practices, is seeking to force Boeing to move production jobs for its new 787 Dreamliner from a nonunion plant in South Carolina to a unionized one in Washington state. Critics say the move could cost the state 1,000 jobs, lending resonance to the GOP admonition that government must simply “get out of the way.”…

“So far, the messages being delivered by the candidates have not been Florida-specific,” said Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn (D). “We have been devastated by the real estate collapse.”