Joe Lieberman’s options in 2012: Retire or turn Republican

Still, in a separate PPP survey earlier in October, 61 percent of Connecticut Republicans (and 66 percent of Connecticut voters overall) said they would prefer to replace, rather than reelect, Lieberman. The incumbent also lost every hypothetical two- and three-way general-election matchup.

“His path to reelection, at least at this point a couple years away, looks extremely difficult,” PPP President Dean Debnam said.

Lieberman recently told POLITICO he hasn’t yet decided whether to retire or run as an independent, a Democrat or a Republican. “All those options are still alive,” he said…

Another independent run, Droney said, is “tough” to envision because Republicans are likely to field a stronger candidate this time around than they did in 2006. The 2006 GOP nominee, Alan Schlesinger, was only nominated as a sacrificial lamb; found to have gambling debts under an assumed name, he received less than 10 percent of the vote.