Lesson of the day: The story of Jacob Maged

After Maged spent three days in jail, the judge canceled the rest of his sentence, remitted the fine and, according to the Times, “gave him a little lecture on the importance of cooperation as opposed to individualism.” The judge emphasized that people “should uphold the president . . . and General Johnson” in their struggle against — among other miscreants — “price cutters.” Then, like a feudal lord granting a dispensation to a serf, the judge promised to have Maged “measure me for a new suit.”

Maged, suitably broken to the saddle of government, removed from his shop window the placard advertising 35-cent pressings and replaced it with a Blue Eagle. “Maged,” reported the Times, “if not quite so ruggedly individualistic as formerly, was a free man once more.” So that is freedom — embracing, under coercion, a government propaganda symbol.