CIA begs Obama: Don't release our 2004 report on detainee interrogations

The May 2004 report, prepared by the CIA’s inspector general, is the most definitive official account to date of the agency’s interrogation system. A heavily redacted version, consisting of a dozen or so paragraphs separated by heavy black boxes and lists of missing pages, was released in May 2008 in response to a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit by the American Civil Liberties Union.

After an ACLU appeal, the Obama administration promised in May to review the report, which consists of more than 100 pages of text and six appendixes of unknown length, and to produce by Friday any additional material that could be released…

A senior intelligence official who has studied the document defended the CIA’s redactions. “There is a lot about how the CIA operated the overall program of detention and interrogation — not just about how they used techniques — that would be sensitive and rightly redacted,” the official said. “I think the Obama administration has made the correct decision that transparency only goes so far on the national security side.”…

Another former official who read the report said its full text laid bare “the good, the bad and the ugly” and added that “I believe that some people would find offensive” what was done, because it was “not in keeping with American values.”