Quinnipiac: Six in ten Americans expect to re-invade Afghanistan

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Why might that be? Because everyone understands just how impotent Joe Biden has left the US in dealing with radical-Islamist terror networks operating out of Afghanistan, that’s why. We’ll get to Biden’s pie-in-the-sky promises in a moment, but take a gander first at his credibility on whether the war is over at all. Take it away, Quinnipiac:

More than 6 in 10 Americans, 62 – 28 percent, say they think American troops will have to return to Afghanistan to fight terrorism. Republicans say 83 – 10 percent and independents say 65 – 25 percent that they think American troops will have to return to Afghanistan to fight terrorism, while Democrats say 52 – 38 percent they think American troops will not have to return to Afghanistan to fight terrorism.

“‘The pullout is over, but boots will be back on the ground eventually,’ predict voters, who clearly see a looming terrorist threat churning in the cauldron that is Afghanistan,” added Malloy.

This is the same Q-poll that Allahpundit analyzed, but this question appears to be a separate release from the survey by Quinnipiac. It could help explain why Biden’s effort to follow a policy with 54% support netted Biden a 34% job approval rating on foreign policy. Of course, Biden’s disgraceful abandonment of Americans in his rush to bug out is part of that too, but large majority of Americans also think he’s basically lied about ending the war at all.

Take a look at the demos on this question:

Every demo except one — Democrats — has at least a plurality that assumes we’ll have to put boots back on the ground in Afghanistan. And every one of those demos except seniors (44/41) has a majority believing that the war is far from over. Even Biden’s base of black (53/41) and Hispanic (65/30) voters don’t buy Biden’s claim to have ended the “forever wars.”

But what about Biden’s promise to utilize a robust “over the horizon” capability for counterterrorism to prevent new attacks out of Afghanistan? Not even experts in counterterrorism know the answer, Axios reported earlier this week, because Biden and his national security team still have not laid out any such plans. Based on what they know of US capabilities and the challenges of a Taliban-controlled Afghanistan, they’re pretty sure Biden and his team are pulling that term from their nether regions:

The Biden administration’s “over-the-horizon” strategy in Afghanistan is drawing serious questions from lawmakers and counterterrorism experts, as the U.S. withdrawal shifts calculations about threats and capabilities.

Driving the news: Tensions ramped up in an Aug. 27 conference call between President Biden’s top national security officials and senators from both parties, sources familiar with the discussions tell Axios. One said members of the intelligence community label it, derisively, the “over-the-rainbow” strategy.

We have already seen one demonstration of Biden’s promise — the remote strike on a supposed ISIS-K suicide bomber that may just have been an American-allied aid worker carrying fresh water back to his family. The Pentagon still insists that the strike prevented a fresh attack on the American positions at the airport in Kabul, but media probing keeps pulling that narrative apart. And that happened when we still had boots on the ground, albeit preoccupied with getting out of the country at that moment. Just think how badly our targeting will decline without having either our own troops on the ground or reliable intelligence from native security forces operating under our protection.

It will not take long for our enemies to reconstitute themselves in Afghanistan. Americans see that clearly enough to create a credibility crisis for Biden, and perhaps a politically fatal one. Because if we didn’t end the war with Biden’s bug-out, then that disgraceful moral catastrophe of leaving Americans and allies behind will have been for absolutely nothing at all other than one old fool’s ego trip after twelve years of opposition to his plans for Afghanistan.