I got a Covid-19 vaccination the other day. Even though I displayed remarkable courage, I was not awarded a lollipop.

Turns out, it appears federal and state public officials are gonna need more than a simple sweet or urgent urgings to get many Americans to take the new needle.

Media and Faucistas are fussing over a chaotic delivery system reminiscent of that botched Obama-BidenCare rollout that fed the historic 2010 midterm rout of Democrats in the House plus about 1,000 elected Dems in state legislatures across the country.

Not that Barack Obama cares, but his party has still not recovered from that electoral catastrophe. And, oh, look, here comes another congressional redistricting.

Millions of doses of the new vaccines have gone missing. Millions of people who want the inoculations haven’t a clue if they qualify, where to go, how to sign up. And somehow some foreign nationals have cut in line ahead of Americans.

Now, comes a national survey revealing that a surprising number of Americans have no intention of submitting their upper arm to the vaccine. Intriguingly, the resistance appears to have a base in one political party.

So much for the much-discussed goal of developing a nationwide herd immunity to the deadly virus that requires upwards of 70 percent inoculations.

A pair of surveys a month apart by Realtime Research found:

  • Willingness to get the vaccine is declining. The January results show a majority (52 percent) now say they are Unlikely or Very Unlikely to get the vaccine, up from December’s results.
  • Sixty-eight percent say they don’t really know if they are even eligible for the vaccine or where to get it if they are.
  • Those willing to submit said, you know, they might just wait a bit before rolling up their sleeve to receive the new vaccine that was developed at warp speed in less than a year.
  • Top reason for passing up the treatment is that, like the virus itself, the immunization is just too new to trust. “You go first.” They want to see what side effects others get or even if the serum works.
  • Additionally, after a year of ineffective authoritarian lock-downs that devastated the economy but not the microscopic virulent virus, many simply do not trust the governments that drove and deliver the rapid development of the new vaccine.

Talk about the virus of a fundamental partisan divide:

Nearly three-quarters of those identifying as Strong Republican said they’re unlikely to get the shots. Even 21 percent of Strong Democrats have decided No. And more than half of independents (54 percent) said they are unlikely to seek the vaccine.

On the other arm, 79 percent of Strong Democrats clearly trust the government assurances and said they will get the inoculations.

All this suggests the obvious official assumption that the simple idea of self-preservation will drive the inoculation industry is proving grossly insufficient to build that collective herd immunity.

But not to worry about Joe Biden. He’s had both his shots. He finally got to see the White House living quarters that Obama kept him out of and Biden defeated a granddaughter the other day in Mario Kart. That deadly cold snap that’s seized much of the country and left millions without power huddling by the fireplace must wait for presidential attention.