LeBron James weighed in on the controversy sparked over Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey’s tweet in support of the protesters in Hong Kong. He slammed Morey for sending the tweet while at the same time James said he didn’t want to “get into a feud with Daryl Morey.”

King James sure has a funny way of trying to stay away from a feud with Morey. Did LeBron think that calling Morey “misinformed” and “not educated” about the protests going on in the streets of Hong Kong was a way of making friends and influencing Morey? He essentially said that Morey is ignorant and should have just waited a week to send his tweet because, you know, it affects his bottom line.

“I don’t want to get into a … feud with Daryl Morey,” James told reporters, “but I believe he wasn’t educated on the situation at hand and he spoke.

“So many people could have been harmed, not only financially, but physically, emotionally, spiritually, so, just be careful what we tweet, what we say, what we do. Even though yes, we do have freedom of speech, there can be a lot of negative that comes from that.”

Spiritually? Maybe for those who worship at the alter of the all-mighty dollar. Let’s be honest, what LeBron means about the negative actions coming from Morey’s tweet is all wrapped up in his ability to make money. His jersey is the most popular selling basketball jersey and he doesn’t want to rock the boat. The status quo in Hong Kong and China is serving him very well. There are 600 million NBA fans in China and that’s a huge market.

This was LeBron’s first public response to the protests in Hong Kong. While he was busy slamming Morey for a seven-word tweet which was quickly deleted, he was standing firm in his support of “the league”. That ‘s the same league that shut down a reporter last week when she asked a question during a press conference with James Harden and Russell Westbrook. The CNN reporter asked, “After the events of this week and the fallout we’ve seen, whether you both would feel differently about speaking out in that way in the future.” A Houston Rockets spokesperson shut her down.

“I’m not here to judge how the league handled the situation,” James said. “I think that, when you’re misinformed or not educated about something, and I’m just talking about the tweet itself, you never know the ramifications that can happen and we all see what that did. Not only did for our league, for all of us in America, for people in China as well. Sometimes you have to think through things that you say that may cause harm to not only for yourself, but for the majority of people. I think that’s just a prime example of that.”

Speaking of ramifications, was LeBron James worried about ramifications after he called President Trump a bum? That happened over a disagreement about an invitation to the White House. Was he worried about the Trump supporters who might not buy his jerseys?

Lebron James had no problem standing in support with Colin Kaepernick taking a knee in protest during NFL games. Yet when Morey stood with the Hong Kong protesters – who carry American flags as they protest – suddenly James wants Americans to kowtow to the brutal Communist dictatorship.

Morey is an educated man. He graduated from the M.I.T. Sloan M.B.A. program and is one of the winningest general managers in the NBA. While Adam Silver, NBA commissioner, publicly supported Morey’s right to excercise free speech, the league went silent.

When James began to receive criticism over his remarks, he doubled down and tried to explain.

While LeBron was in China with the Lakers, some American politicians were in Hong Kong. Senator Josh Hawley tweeted his response. He points out that people are being harmed – the protesters in the streets.

James is a Nike sponsored athlete. Nike prides itself in delivering woke social justice messages in advertising. It’s not like LeBron James doesn’t speak out in political ways. For him to now tell others to just shut up because it will affect his earning capacity is beyond the pale. He would have been better off just remaining silent himself.