Episode 12 left off with student protesters swarming into the administrative building and ordering deans and administrators into President George Bridges’ office so they could immediately take action on the students’ demands. In this episode, a rumor spreads that the campus police are coming and the protesters begin piling furniture in front of the doors to keep the cops out.

What the protesters don’t know is that President Bridges has already ordered the police (the campus police force had six officers in all) to stand down. So no one is coming. In any case, the students’ plans to resist a police siege are interrupted by an admissions officer who begins shouting loudly in the hallway about what the students are doing. “Use your frickin’ brains. This ain’t doing nothing…You want to block the freaking doors. This ain’t changing nothing.” The man seems to be having a meltdown.

At the same time, professors are being held in the building by protesters who keep trying to guilt them into caring about whatever issues the students have. Some mobs of students are also stopping cars and deciding who is allowed on and off the campus. It’s an instant police state.

But the main goal is still to force the top administrators to sign off on the list of demands. Protest leader Jamil went into President Bridges’ office and asked if anyone needed anything. Bridges replied, “Jamil, I need to pee.”

“Hold it,” Jamil replied. The students are playing at controlling the campus and the administration is playing along. There’s a long scene near the end of this clip that explains why. A group of teachers holding a teacher appreciation day with cake find themselves being admonished by the protesters for not showing enough support for the cause. “Didn’t you educated us on how to do sh*t like this?” one student protester said. She seemed genuinely confused. The protesters really were doing exactly what they’ve been programmed to do by the far left faculty. Why wasn’t the faculty joining in?

This episode wraps up with Jonathan Haidt, author of The Coddling of the American Mind, comparing two views of what education should be, one based on J.S. Mill and one based on Karl Marx. “If we imagine a university based upon a more Marxist approach to intellectual life, it’s going to look extremely different,” Haidt said. You can probably guess which one Evergreen is modeling.