When you think of the downstream effects of the Obama administration’s EPA regulations, the first states which come to mind tend to be in coal country and what remains of the rust belt and manufacturing centers. That’s all true enough, but it seems that when the government puts its thumb on the scale, the ripples can be felt in ever widening circles. This includes what might be one of the last states you’d think of… Vermont.

Vermont will lose 3.4 percent of its manufacturing jobs by 2023 due to Obama administration climate regulations, according to a report on the impact of EPA rules on labor.

In recent years, the EPA has issued new rules for power plants and vehicles in an attempt to cut carbon dioxide emissions.

While many studies examine how the rules will affect global emissions, a study published last week by The Heritage Foundation calculates how many manufacturing jobs states will lose due to environmental regulations.

According to the report, the U.S. will surrender 586,000 manufacturing jobs by 2023 due to increased regulatory cost burdens on businesses. Of those job losses, an estimated 1,378 will come from Vermont.

The Mountain State isn’t the only one in this rather light manufacturing area feeling the squeeze. The report estimates that tiny Rhode Island will lose 3.16% of their manufacturing jobs and New Hampshire will bleed out a shocking 6.39%. But Vermont still seems like the strangest sister in this particular group. How do they explain this?

Vermont’s latest jobs report indicates that, after suffering several years of losses, the state is down to only 337,300 workers. The new regulations will put the pinch on employers by driving up costs across multiple sectors, leading to smaller employers having to let some folks go. It’s not that massive of a number by itself in national terms, but when you have that few jobs to begin with any significant bite is more painful.

This is just a handy set of numbers to keep in your pocket until 2016. Vermont and Connecticut may be mostly lost causes, but the good people of New Hampshire may want to recall that six percent job loss figure (Thanks, EPA!) when they next head to the polls.