What better way to relax this evening than to settle in and watch … a war of wills between a climate-change extremist and Piers Morgan? This actually aired yesterday morning in the UK, but it’s enough fun that it’s worth watching today. Our colleagues at Townhall have a clip of the most heated moment between Morgan and Extinction Rebellion’s Skeena Rathor, but the whole 12-minute segment is worth watching.

It doesn’t take long for Morgan to fire off his opening volley over Rathor’s personal commitment to zero-carbon-emission living — which Rathor spends most of this segment attempting to dodge.

The meat of this argument around the 5:30 mark of the video, right after Rathor starts talking about the need to “disrupt businesses.” Rathor never does answer Morgan’s questions, but be sure to watch all the way through to confirm:

“Do you see the problem with all this? You go on about ‘My kids can’t get out of bed because they’re all so terrified,’ I’m not surprised they’re terrified because your mum’s telling them everyday the planet’s about to end, and yet, I bet your own carbon footprint, for all the stuff I’ve just mentioned is terrible,” Morgan said.

“So why don’t you give your computer, give up your television, give up your air conditioning, walk your kids to school, get a bike to the studio. Why don’t you practice what you preach?” he added.

Rathor said the problem is “really not about individual carbon footprints,” but that she needs to be within the system in order to “raise the alarm” about the issue. Funny, that — most people work within the system in order to provide a living and their current standard of living. That’s precisely what Rathor is doing and is completely unwilling to give up, even if she doesn’t want to admit it or even acknowledge the issue.

Why? Rathor says she doesn’t want to be “thrown into a shame situation.” Oh, well …

Anyway, there are other good moments in here besides Morgan’s chasing Rathor around the rhetorical mulberry bush. Mike Neville notes that Extinction Rebellion’s antics cost a lot of money for working-class folks and for the businesses that employ them, which apparently is part of the “disruption” that Rathor likes better than giving up television. Neville refers to the activists as “champagne socialists,” which is a phrase that makes watching the whole clip worthwhile on its own. Although I do have to give props to Boris Johnson’s “uncooperative crusties” remark in the chyron, too. They’re both keepers.