At 10:30 am today, Gov. Mitt Romney will deliver his “Faith in America” speech. Because it is being carried live on Ustream, we’ll carry the speech here. Keep an eye on this post.

Update: Here is the Ustream channel recorded speech.

If the embedded recording doesn’t work, you can go here to watch it.

Here are a few excerpts from the speech.

“There are some who may feel that religion is not a matter to be seriously considered in the context of the weighty threats that face us. If so, they are at odds with the nation’s founders, for they, when our nation faced its greatest peril, sought the blessings of the Creator. And further, they discovered the essential connection between the survival of a free land and the protection of religious freedom. In John Adam’s words: ‘We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion… Our constitution was made for a moral and religious people.’

“Freedom requires religion just as religion requires freedom. Freedom opens the windows of the soul so that man can discover his most profound beliefs and commune with God. Freedom and religion endure together, or perish alone.”

“When I place my hand on the Bible and take the oath of office, that oath becomes my highest promise to God. If I am fortunate to become your president, I will serve no one religion, no one group, no one cause, and no one interest. A President must serve only the common cause of the people of the United States.”

“There are some who would have a presidential candidate describe and explain his church’s distinctive doctrines. To do so would enable the very religious test the founders prohibited in the constitution. No candidate should become the spokesman for his faith. For if he becomes President he will need the prayers of the people of all faiths.”

Update (AP): Excellent point by Geraghty: “Chances are, you have an idea in your head of what you think Romney should say. And my guess is, he’s not going to say it. A lot of people are going to walk away saying, ‘Why did he say X when he should have talked about Y?'”