Fox News is breaking right now to say she’s been formally charged but I can’t find a story yet. I’ll update momentarily. In the meantime, 200 lashes for riding in a car with an unrelated male, 40 lashes potentially for naming a teddy bear “Mohammed,” and for belonging to Al Qaeda — parole, after having been duly “reformed.”

Shari’a fever, baby. Catch it!

A SEVEN-YEAR-OLD Sudanese boy yesterday defended the British teacher accused of insulting Islam, saying he had chosen to call a teddy bear Mohammad because it was his own name.

“The teacher asked me what I wanted to call the teddy,” he said shyly, his voice barely rising above a whisper. “I said Mohammad. I named it after my name.”…

She has been moved from a local police station to the CID HQ, and one of the guards there said: “She is sitting all by herself. No-one has talked to her. No-one has been in to see her today and she looks very sad. She has also had no food yet.”

One of her new friends in Khartoum said visitors had found her looking pale and dishevelled. “It sounds as if she is very tired and distressed by what is going on,” he said. “She is really struggling to cope.”

The deputy justice minister said this morning that she’s had food. As for that possible 10-year sentence, scroll down. I’m off to go find out what they charged her with. Blasphemy and the lash? Or sedition and a Sudanese dungeon until circa 2017?

Update: Blasphemy and the lash it is! Well, maybe — they could sentence her alternatively to prison or a fine. Will the government be tsk-tsking this one the way the Saudis have been doing re: the gang-rape victim’s sentence? Nope:

Ministry spokesman, Ali al-Sadeq, said the case of a “teacher’s misconduct against the Islamic faith” should not have provoked a British government caution warning to its citizens in Sudan.

Al-Sadeq said this was particularly so after the school had apologized to the parents, pupils and to the Sudanese in general for the teacher’s “unacceptable conduct.”

Update: Excellent stuff from the American Islamic Congress. “The sad legacy of the Danish cartoon riots is that we have to speak out immediately when extremists try to provoke clashes over trivial matters.”