You know how the 2022 elections looked great for the GOP? Not so fast, buttercup

All the recent political buzz about the 2022 midterms has been positive for Republicans taking back control of at least one chamber of Congress and stalling Joe Biden’s increasingly progressive agenda. There’s good reason for that. The GOP need only gain five seats to retire Nancy Pelosi again and make Kevin McCarthy, another Californian, the new House Speaker.

Just four months into his 48-month White House lease, Biden and his inattentive vice president have turned the Southern border situation into a festering crisis of humanity, though the administration won’t use the word “crisis.”

Biden has put Kamala Harris in charge of the, uh, situation there, but she has not bothered to go there. Good reason for that also because such a visit would attract scores of journalists and cameras, which would reveal the mess the White House is trying to hide.

With trillions of freshly-printed dollars flowing out of the Treasury and trillions more on the legislative drawing board, the scary specter of inflation is creeping into government statistics and the public’s consciousness.

Mr. Unity is deservedly famous for verbal gaffes. Now, he’s adding a perversely reverse Midas touch to steering the pandemic’s economic recovery.

As if four percent inflation isn’t already draining personal incomes, Biden has announced plans to jack up taxes to appease his revenue-hungry posse of left wing progressives. Biden’s proudly-announced plans for somewhere around $4 trillion in new revenue are settling over the country like fiscal smog.

News Flash: Taxing only the rich ain’t gonna rake in that much.

In reaction, employers in April brought new hires to a screeching, unexpected halt, creating less than a third of the expected new jobs. This actually boosted the national unemployment rate with thousands suckered into returning to the labor market.

No president’s name is on a midterm ballot. But his first midterm election is historically an initial verdict on a presidency. Nineteen of the last 21 midterms have a seen the president’s party lose seats. (Only George W. Bush’s first and Bill Clinton’s post-impeachment in 1998 saw gains.) Losses average around 30 House seats.

Clinton’s disastrous first midterm turned over 53 House districts to Newt Gingrich’s Contract with America GOP.

Optimistic Republicans were already rubbing their hands and dreaming of another historic Democrat-drubbing like voters administered to Obama’s party at all levels of government in his first midterm elections in 2010.

The party lost 63 House seats that day, the worst showing in decades and upwards of 1,000 state seats that, crucially, gave the GOP control of congressional redistricting after that Census.

Of course, the Obamas still got rich, but Democrats have yet to recover from that devastation at the state level. And here comes another congressional redistricting. So, even 536 days out, Republicans were feeling mighty good about Nov. 8, 2022.

But hold on, folks.

A new Gallup poll finds Democrats humming along now with a steady presidential job approval around 54 percent, 15 points higher than Trump’s early reviews. Americans have been justifiably wary of giving one party total control in Washington. So, they unexpectedly whittled down Pelosi’s caucus by 10 seats last November and sent an evenly-split Senate to Capitol Hill.

Right now, the new Gallup survey found the approval of Congress, with Democrats in charge, has increased slightly since January to 31 percent now. It’s a sad measure of the partisan atmosphere that less than one-third approval is considered pretty good.

More than 90 percent of Democrats approve of Biden’s job performance, despite his short work days, and 54 percent approve of Congress. A majority of independents (54 percent) approve of Biden, while only 28 percent like Congress’ job.

Oh, look! A whopping eight percent of Republicans approve of Biden and Congress.

So far anyway, the sense of relief as Covid restrictions ease seems to outweigh the burden on Democrats of the illegal alien crisis on the border and soaring gas prices. As usual, sympathetic media coverage has helped with that.