Kappa Kappa Gamma doubles down on trans sorority membership

University of Wyoming/Screenshot via YouTube

Earlier this year, we learned of a situation unfolding at the University of Wyoming, where the young women of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority were running into a problem. Their sorority had taken it upon themselves to invite a transgender “sister” to join their ranks. Plenty of creepiness ensued, and many of the young ladies no longer felt comfortable in their own home. Finally, after their appeals fell on deaf ears, a group of the sisters obtained legal counsel and brought a lawsuit against the sorority and the university. That process is still playing out, but according to court documents obtained by National Review this week, the sorority is “doubling down.” They are asking the court to dismiss the “frivolous” lawsuit and reject the young women’s “exclusionary definition” that answers the question raised by Matt Walsh. What is a woman?

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The Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority is doubling down after being sued by several of its members for admitting a male student into its sisterhood, asking a court Tuesday to dismiss the “frivolous” lawsuit and implying that the plaintiffs are motivated by anti-trans bigotry.

In March, six female University of Wyoming students sued KKG and its president Mary Pat Rooney, arguing that their chapter’s decision to admit a man, Artemis Langford, violated the national organization’s corporate charter…

In response, KKG alleges that the women asked the “Court to insert itself into this controversial political debate and declare that a private organization can only interpret the term ‘woman’ using Plaintiffs’ exclusionary definition of biologically born females,” according to a motion to dismiss obtained by National Review.

How the courts will respond remains to be seen, but hopefully, they will be looking for better data than this. It’s bad enough when we have large, professional medical associations making pronouncements based on virtually no data, but now we have a judge being lectured by the president of a sorority. And she is a person who is trained in (checks notes) running a sorority. It’s virtually the only thing she’s done since graduating. But she is now somehow an expert in gender issues and defining men and women. Awesome.

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She cites “scholarly articles, political debate, or media commentary” in her letter, without providing the court with a single example. And if the sisters who brought the case wish to continue on this course, she urges them to resign from the sorority if they can’t tolerate KKG’s “position of inclusion.”

You can go back to the previous articles I linked above for the full details of what was going on in that sorority house because it’s honestly kind of gross to dump into this article in full. But I would hope that an actual woman wouldn’t be staring silently at another female who is walking down the hall to the shower in a towel or hiding an obvious bulge in her pants with a pillow. The fact is, Artemis Langford is as much of a woman as that kid in the East Sussex school is really a cat.

Rather than focusing on whether or not the ladies who brought the lawsuit should be driven from the sorority, perhaps Mary Pat Rooney (which is the most sorority-sounding name imaginable) might start considering other questions that address the bigger picture. I did a bit of checking and discovered that Kappa Kappa Gamma has a membership of more than a quarter million women and at least 140 chapters across the United States and Canada. It’s considered a prestigious sorority (known as a “rich girls sorority”) with many girls entering college each year vying for a spot, along with high school girls who plan to follow on their heels.

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If this situation was offensive enough to the young women in this chapter that they were actually willing to go to court over it and potentially be booted from the sisterhood, do you honestly think they’re the only ones? This story has been all over the news for months now and surely every young lady who is a member or aspiring to be one has heard about it by now. How many of them do you suppose are having second thoughts? How many potential applicants might be scrolling down the page a bit further and looking for a more female-friendly home away from home?

Keep in mind what the ladies who brought the lawsuit said in one of their interviews. They didn’t join that sorority to be creeped out and made to feel unsafe. They went there for sisterhood. They went there to build alliances and support networks. They went there to meet their future bridesmaids. Is this really the reputation that Kappa Kappa Gamma wants to establish for itself going forward?

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David Strom 3:30 PM | June 20, 2024
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