The government doesn't want to talk about your actual concerns

AP Photo/John Hanna

I would add to the title statement by saying the media most certainly doesn’t want to talk about your concerns either. Do we have any proof of this? Perhaps so, particularly if you look at what actually concerns Americans and what the government is focusing on. Gallup periodically asks Americans to declare what they think is “the most important problem facing the country today.” Rather than offering multiple choice answers, they leave it open for respondents to say whatever they like, matching the answers to a number of related categories. In today’s Morning Jolt at National Review, Jim Geraghty addresses what he describes as “Our Profoundly Unserious Moment.” Jim runs down the list of the most common answers.

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The single most common answer was “the government,” or “poor leadership,” at 18 percent. Fourteen percent said the economy in general, and 9 percent said inflation or high cost of living.

(I know much smarter economic minds than mine can lay out the case that inflation is largely conquered by pointing to data from the Consumer Price Index and Producer Price Index; I would simply note that many Americans don’t feel like inflation has been conquered.)

Eight percent said immigration; 7 percent said “guns” or “gun control”; 6 percent said “crime” or “violence”; 4 percent said “race relations” or “racism”; 3 percent said “poverty/hunger/homelessness”; and another 3 percent said “ethics/moral/religious/family decline.”

Keep that list in mind and consider what news stories are generating the most buzz in the media. Then consider what the President and congressional leaders are spending their time talking about. We are repeatedly assured that some sort of “transgender genocide” is going on and we should all be fighting about transgender issues. Far too many of us regularly comply and ramp up the argument. (I’m guilty of that myself.) Massive protests and riots take place in response.

We’re told that the country simply can’t move forward without addressing systemic racism and reparations. Blue states are weighing laws to pay unsustainable reparations. “Maga Republicans” are blamed for holding up progress. And, of course, democracy and borders are what we’re supposed to care about the most, provide you’re talking about Ukraine. I’ve lost track of the billions of dollars that have been flushed into that. Arguments break out on cable news over this every single day.

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Now go back and look at Jim’s list again. The economy, along with inflation and the cost of living were two of only three subjects to reach near or above the ten percent mark. And yet KJP tells us almost daily that the economy is doing fine. A disappointingly low but still substantial eight percent selected immigration. Yet the same White House Press Secretary says the border is closed and illegal immigration is down 90% and moves on to the next question.

Crime also cracked the five percent level. But only low single digits were registered for concerns over racism and homelessness. Nobody tried to say that transgender issues were our biggest challenge, though a few did mention race relations. And yet these low-scoring (or non-scoring) topics dominate the news and the legislature.

The higher-scoring topics are things that the government and its obedient scribes in the legacy media do not want to discuss. With that in mind, take one last look at Jim’s list. What’s the number one problem on people’s minds? “The government” or “poor leadership.” And that is the last thing in the world that the White House or CNN or MSNBC want to talk about or to hear you talking about. That subject is off limits and our President with his approval ratings in the low 30s on a good day wants you to disappear if you bring it up.

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Yes, our friend Jim Geraghty is correct. We are living through a most unserious moment indeed. And it’s pushing the country toward the bottom of the drain.

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John Stossel 5:30 PM | July 13, 2024
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