Democrats seeing bail reform backlash in blue strongholds

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Here’s another one of those “popular” policy proposals that Democrats across the nation have been pushing as part of their “social justice” agenda. We’re talking about bail reform, or at least that’s how Democrats describe it. The “reform” in question means eliminating cash bail for defendants who are arrested for “minor” or non-violent crimes, including some felonies. They claim that the cash bail system unfairly targets poorer minority communities by leaving those unable to make bail locked up while awaiting trial. It’s been passed in New York and many parts of California, along with some other blue states and cities.

The alleged popularity of this concept was seriously put to the test on Long Island yesterday in Nassau and Suffolk Counties. The two counties make up the majority of Long Island and Democrats have enjoyed a string of electoral victories there in recent years, controlling most elected offices. But all of the liberals pushing bail reform might want to take a look at what happened in the races for County District Attorney in both places. Democratic incumbents were previously expected to continue to hold their positions, but their Republican opponents turned each race into a referendum on the bail reform measures that the Democrats had supported. The results weren’t even close. Both Democrats were blown out in what’s being described as a “red tsunami” and they took a few other Democratic office-holders down along with them. (NY Post)

A red tide swept over Long Island, with the Republican candidates for district attorney in both Nassau and Suffolk counties winning their races in stunning landslides Tuesday — turning the campaigns into a referendum on New York’s controversial bail reform law.

In Nassau, career local prosecutor Anne Donnelly upset Democratic state Sen. Todd Kaminsky, a former federal prosecutor, who voted for the 2019 law that eliminated cash bail to defendants accused of many misdemeanor and “non-violent” felony crimes.

Donnelly, who was deputy chief of the Nassau DA’s organized crime and rackets bureau, won 145,766 or 60 percent of the vote to 97,299 votes or 40 percent for Kaminsky — a 20 point blowout.

Donnelly promised to restore law and order as District Attorney and repeatedly hammered the Democrat for his votes in favor of the bail reform law. Seeing a 20 point spread in that race is really quite remarkable as previous elections had been far closer.

The story in Suffolk County was much the same. Incumbent Democratic District Attorney Tim Sini was probably expecting a far different outcome, but he wound up being walloped by Republican challenger Ray Tierney by a 57-43 margin. Once again, bail reform was the most frequently discussed issue during the debates. And those weren’t the only offices to change hands as the dominos continued to fall late into the evening.

In the race for Nassau County Executive, incumbent Democrat Laura Curran was trailing GOP challenger Bruce Blakeman by a margin of 52-48 last night. They will have to wait for the absentee ballots to be counted to finalize the results, but Curran would need to take more than 75% of them to turn that one around. The race to select the next Nassau County Comptroller was even more of a blowout, with the Republican challenger taking more than 60% of the vote.

Reached for comment, Jay Jacobs, the Nassau County Democratic Party Chairman only said that it was “not a particularly good night.”

I think it’s tough to argue that this is yet another example of the Democrats completely misreading the public and paying a price for it at the ballot box. Bail reform seems to be a wildly popular idea among progressive activists who claim that the entire system is rooted in racism. But the voters who have to live with the results of these “reforms” obviously see something very different. When you turn the jails into revolving doors for criminals and crime rates immediately begin to rise, any lofty speeches about “social justice” simply go out the window.

People want to be safe and secure from criminals in their homes and on the streets in their communities. They expect their elected officials to do everything possible to make that happen. So when they being seeing carjackings taking place right on the street where they live on a nearly daily basis and the same faces being arrested and released over and over, someone is going to have to be held accountable. Last night on Long Island, the hammer of accountability was brought down. And they brought it down hard.