More new border wall construction angers usual suspects

The government is getting started on another 100 miles of new border wall/barrier construction, primarily in Arizona and California this month. It’s mostly being funded through the Department of Defense budget since the Democrats in the House still don’t care to discuss the matter. A couple of these stretches of the border are going through some areas that have liberals even more upset than usual. These include a national monument and a wildlife refuge. (Associated Press)

The U.S. government plans on replacing barriers through 100 miles (161 kilometers) of the southern border in California and Arizona, including through a national monument and a wildlife refuge, according to documents and environmental advocates.

The Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday again waived environmental and dozens of other laws to build more barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Funding will come from the Defense Department following the emergency declaration that President Donald Trump signed this year after Congress refused to approve the amount of border wall funding he requested.

It appears that declaring an emergency really does get some things moving after all, I guess. The first thing to know here is that most of the construction isn’t technically “new” border wall. Particularly in Arizona, they’re replacing long stretches of “waist-high fencing” that was only designed to stop vehicles from driving through. Unfortunately, it doesn’t do much to stop anyone crossing on foot unless they’re in a wheelchair. The new barrier will consist of a low concrete wall topped with steel bollards or slats rising up to heights from 18 to 30 feet. That should prove a bit more restrictive to pedestrian traffic.

The environmental waivers issued for the construction seem to be what really have activists up in arms. Construction is set to begin along the edge of the Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. While environmentalists are protesting this move, the linked report admits that there was so much drug traffic coming over the border in that region that parts of it had to be closed to the public for several years.

And of course, we already dealt with the issues of border wall construction at the National Butterfly Center in Texas. One can sympathize with the nature lovers there because it might disrupt their migratory patterns in some fashion. Just imagine it. If only butterflies had some way to lift themselves ten or fifteen feet in the air to get over the wall…