Tsarnaev will get to speak at his sentencing tomorrow

Tomorrow will be the sentencing of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev for the terrorist murder of multiple people at the Boston Marathon. The proceeding is essentially a formality, as the judge has no option other than to order the death sentence selected by the jury. But there may be one slight twist to the proceedings. Tsarnaev sat stoic and silent for virtually the entire trial. We never really heard from him. But now, at this last phase of the process before the appeals begin, the monster will be allowed to speak to the court if he wishes.

Lawyers for Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev have said he feels remorse for the deadly attack, but the public has never heard directly from him. When he is formally sentenced Wednesday to death, he will be given an opportunity to address the court, but it’s not clear if he’ll take it.

Legal experts say Tsarnaev, 21, has little or nothing to gain by speaking since the judge is required to impose the death sentence recommended by the jury. Some wonder, though, whether he could decide to apologize or even make a political statement…

“He’s somewhat of an enigma at this point. No one really knows what he will do,” said attorney David Hoose, who represented veterans hospital nurse Kristen Gilbert in her 2003 federal death penalty trial for killing four patients. Gilbert received a life sentence. More than 20 bombing victims are expected to speak during Tsarnaev’s sentencing hearing, including family members of those who died and people who were injured in the explosions.

Hoose said he can’t see any legal advantage for Tsarnaev to speak.

“I don’t think there’s anything to be gained by it at this point. Whatever would be said, I think, would be viewed as too little, too late,” Hoose said.

The beast is still technically a US citizen, so if he decides to speak I suppose there’s no getting around it. And in some strange, perhaps disturbing way, I find myself almost hoping he will. It’s not that Tsarnaev has anything to say which we need to hear or some important message which is going to change my mind about him. I want the courts to get through the mandatory appeal process with all alacrity and put this vermin down and be done with it. But at the same time I find myself experiencing a kind of sick fascination, like seeing one of the vampires from a horror movie chained up in silver and caught for a moment in time.

What would he say? Would he express some remorse at this late date? Much like Mr. Hoose, I could care less about that. If he’d ever felt any real remorse the time for that is long past. Would he make a political speech about how evil America is and deliver some defiant proclamation about how he looks forward to going to his eternal reward with a pile of virgins? Perhaps that would reinforce what I was already set to believe about him, but it certainly wouldn’t help him during his appeals. If his lawyer has the sense God gave a goat he’ll be advising him not to do that. But what else could he say? Just some long, drawn out goodbye to the cruel world?

Good enough for me. Goodbye, Dzhokhar. The reward Satan has in mind for you is probably not the one you’re expecting, but it’s still better than you deserve.