Is the western way of raising kids weird?

In most other societies around the world, babies stick with their parents longer. A 2016 review that looked at research on children sharing not just a room but a bed with one or more of their parents found a high prevalence in many Asian countries: over 70% in India and Indonesia, for example, and over 80% in Sri Lanka and Vietnam. Research on bedsharing rates in countries across Africa is patchy, but where it does exist suggests the practice is near-universal.

Debmita Dutta, a doctor and parenting consultant in Bangalore, India, says that despite Western influences, bedsharing remains a strong tradition in India – even in households where children have their own rooms. “A family of four has three bedrooms, one each for each child and for the parents, and then you would find both the children in the parent’s bed,” she says. “It’s that common.”

Bedsharing is one way to reduce the burden of babies waking up at night, says Dutta. Her own daughter had a rollout bed next to her parents’ that she could sleep on until she was seven years old. “Even after she stopped breastfeeding, she still liked to sleep with us in the same room,” she says.