Meagan Wolfe, Wisconsin’s chief elections official, said Monday that the estimated price tag is $7.9 million, which is much higher than the $2 million statewide recount that was conducted after the 2016 election.

“These estimates are significantly higher than the actual costs of the 2016 recount, but they take into account factors not present four years ago, including the need for larger spaces to permit public observation and social distancing, security for those spaces, the higher number of absentee ballots, a compressed timeframe over a holiday, and renting high-speed ballot scanning equipment,” Wolfe said.

The deadline to file for a recount and submit payment by 5 p.m. CT Wednesday, and that day is the only day that the Trump campaign can file its request. The recount must be completed by December 1, which is also the deadline, under state law, for the Wisconsin Elections Commission to certify the results.