The big picture: None of the leading contenders in the U.S. are being tested for their effectiveness in children. Even once one of them gains authorization from the Food and Drug Administration, there will only be a limited number of available doses…

“If you protect children, then you will reduce community spread and protect adults, so it’s more of a herd immunity rather than a specific immunity question,” explains John Moore, a professor of immunobiology at Weill Cornell Medical College. “If you need 70% protection in herd immunity, at some point you will need to include children in that.”