In talking to numerous Republican House members Tuesday, it was hard to escape the conclusion that the sustained attack on Cheney was a preview of the post-election battles that will define the Republican party. Those members who have thrown in entirely with Trump have shown little tolerance for any views that might differ from those coming from the White House. Cheney has been supportive of Trump in many respects—defending him on impeachment, praising his elimination of Qassem Suleimani, endorsing his re-election. But it’s not enough. TrumpWorld demands 100 percent fealty, 100 percent of the time…

Republicans have long understood that such battles are inevitable. And as Trump’s re-election has seemed less and less likely, some elected GOPers have shown a willingness to contradict the White House line. Asked by The Dispatch’s Declan Garvey for a comment on Trump’s threat to veto legislation that requires renaming facilities honoring confederate soldiers, Sen. Ben Sasse made a clear mocking reference to Trump’s disparaging remarks about John McCain, when he said: “Call me old fashioned, but I like generals who weren’t traitors.” And as the president’s poll numbers have suffered, other Republicans have shown more willingness to create some distance with Trump.

Interestingly, even Gaetz seems to understand that there are more traditional conservatives than Trump acolytes. “I do suspect that Liz still has substantial respect within the Republican conference,” he said, shortly before another sizzle,”because we got a lot of people in the Republican conference who aren’t the biggest supporters of the president.”