Retirements, resignations, the political calendar and the coronavirus pandemic have all conspired to load up Georgia’s ballot with key races this fall, including two Senate seats that could decide control of the chamber, a state House that could flip just before the legislature kicks off redistricting, competitive House races and 16 Electoral College votes that are up for grabs for the first time since the ‘90s. And two of Georgia Democrats’ highest-profile leaders — Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and 2018 gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams — have been a part of the monthslong conversation about Biden’s vice presidential pick.

A half-dozen Georgia Democrats granted anonymity to discuss the issue candidly conceded that both women’s lack of prior federal experience could make them long shots for the vice presidency. Some noted that Abrams has noticeably faded from public VP speculation in recent weeks, while Bottoms has enjoyed an elevated profile as she battles Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp over the response to the coronavirus. But they also said that Biden has a rare chance to tip a long-coveted state into the Democratic column with a surge of attention, investment and enthusiasm that would come with picking a running mate from Georgia…

“It’d take an already supercharged Democratic electorate up to the next level,” said Bob Trammell, the state House Democratic minority leader, who’s drawn multimillion-dollar spending commitments against him from the GOP’s national state legislative campaign committee.